Crazy rants aside… Ima keep doing me and you do you though ===== It isn’t my place to say what’s what or judge other’s lives. Blah blah beautiful snowflake, unique World. Your oyster. Sigh. It’s been one of those weeks….

Crazy rants aside…

Ima keep doing me and you do you though


=====


It isn’t my place to say what’s what or judge other’s lives.

Blah blah beautiful snowflake, unique

World. Your oyster.

Sigh. It’s been one of those weeks….

dampsandwich: one day i will escape from this website (via gossipgoats)

dampsandwich:

one day i will escape from this website

(via gossipgoats)

Alcoholics Anonymous has changed a bit haha Sobriety was the answer to a non-existent question for me. Just like getting intoxicated was initially. The question, I thought, was what can I do to normalize or level myself out? “What do I need to get through today?” And the truth is, after years of depression, guilt and remorse and long nights spent wondering whether I’d get through each day, I realized. I didn’t need anything else. I just needed to be comfortable in my own skin. I do not believe I have a problem with substance abuse. That is not to say I’ll go buck wild and party all the time; similarly I will not whole heartedly abstain from such things either. Drugs and alcohol were never something I needed. I never woke up and craved these things or needed them to get through the day. I got fucked up to escape my life. We all have problems. And self-medicating for some of us is the answer. At 24, I don’t feel like it’s societally or psychologically responsible of me to distance myself from those my age who go and party or have a good time. I live in New Orleans for Christ’s sake! And that’s not to say I can’t enjoy myself sober. The problems that we need to address are not our dependence or abuse on or of anything, but how and why we develop these tendencies to gravitate towards intoxication to avoid our real problems. Almost 2 years in NA and AA have taught me only two things: Most people’s issues in AA have very little to do with substances or abusing them. They have learned to cope with life by escaping their reality through intoxication. Once it becomes comfortable, it’s a routine. And when things get better, and they celebrate, or worse, and they self medicate, they continue their downwards spiral and keep doing more and more until nothing satiates that hunger; until nothing fills the empty hole in their hearts. It’s more important to address how and why we drink/drug than to label it as the sole problem. And this is not something that is ever talked about in modern psychopharmacology and addiction science for whatever reason. It’s more important to me to learn from my mistakes than condemn my past because society says I have a problem. Users need to understand. The bigger problem for their future isn’t their substance abuse; it’s the reason they abuse to begin with. Addressing people’s real issues will save them years of sobriety and misinformed malarkey. The 2nd and most important thing I learned from AA/NA was to always move forward. Never look back. The present and future are all you have. To move forward, side step your fear and anxiety, your anger or sorrow, and confront your worries and problems head on. Only then will we come to understand our own shortcomings and why we turned to substance abuse in the first place. Or something like that idk. I don’t mean to be preachy but those who need help to turn away from substance abuse should give this a quick read yo. It always bothered me that addiction was a “disease”. Quite the convenient excuse to sweep our shortcomings under the rug and blame all our problems on a substance. Quite Convenient Indeed *TLDR Society in America has misconstrued the cause and effects of addiction, and for some reason no one is talking about it! I learned 2 things from AA/NA; Never look back and deal with your real issues, the ones that led you to use in the first place, before you try to blame your troubles on addiction or substance abuse.

Alcoholics Anonymous has changed a bit haha

Sobriety was the answer to a non-existent question for me. Just like getting intoxicated was initially. The question, I thought, was what can I do to normalize or level myself out?

“What do I need to get through today?” And the truth is, after years of depression, guilt and remorse and long nights spent wondering whether I’d get through each day, I realized. I didn’t need anything else. I just needed to be comfortable in my own skin.

I do not believe I have a problem with substance abuse. That is not to say I’ll go buck wild and party all the time; similarly I will not whole heartedly abstain from such things either. Drugs and alcohol were never something I needed. I never woke up and craved these things or needed them to get through the day. I got fucked up to escape my life.

We all have problems. And self-medicating for some of us is the answer. At 24, I don’t feel like it’s societally or psychologically responsible of me to distance myself from those my age who go and party or have a good time. I live in New Orleans for Christ’s sake! And that’s not to say I can’t enjoy myself sober.

The problems that we need to address are not our dependence or abuse on or of anything, but how and why we develop these tendencies to gravitate towards intoxication to avoid our real problems.

Almost 2 years in NA and AA have taught me only two things:

Most people’s issues in AA have very little to do with substances or abusing them. They have learned to cope with life by escaping their reality through intoxication. Once it becomes comfortable, it’s a routine. And when things get better, and they celebrate, or worse, and they self medicate, they continue their downwards spiral and keep doing more and more until nothing satiates that hunger; until nothing fills the empty hole in their hearts.

It’s more important to address how and why we drink/drug than to label it as the sole problem. And this is not something that is ever talked about in modern psychopharmacology and addiction science for whatever reason.

It’s more important to me to learn from my mistakes than condemn my past because society says I have a problem.

Users need to understand. The bigger problem for their future isn’t their substance abuse; it’s the reason they abuse to begin with. Addressing people’s real issues will save them years of sobriety and misinformed malarkey.

The 2nd and most important thing I learned from AA/NA was to always move forward. Never look back. The present and future are all you have.

To move forward, side step your fear and anxiety, your anger or sorrow, and confront your worries and problems head on.

Only then will we come to understand our own shortcomings and why we turned to substance abuse in the first place.

Or something like that idk. I don’t mean to be preachy but those who need help to turn away from substance abuse should give this a quick read yo.

It always bothered me that addiction was a “disease”. Quite the convenient excuse to sweep our shortcomings under the rug and blame all our problems on a substance.

Quite
Convenient
Indeed

*TLDR Society in America has misconstrued the cause and effects of addiction, and for some reason no one is talking about it! I learned 2 things from AA/NA; Never look back and deal with your real issues, the ones that led you to use in the first place, before you try to blame your troubles on addiction or substance abuse.
“Sanity and happiness are an impossible combination.”
Speaking of the Tree of Life… It’s time to take a walk to the source Uptown. Breathe in the future and what not.

Speaking of the Tree of Life…

It’s time to take a walk to the source Uptown. Breathe in the future and what not.

vufus:

"Tree of Life"
Artist:Marcia Baldwin